VINCE ECTOR, ORGANATOMY


Meeting drummer Vince Ector for the first time, after attending singer Giacomo Gates’ unabashedly hip and swinging 2013 appearance at Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola in NYC in support of his Miles Davis tribute CD, was like reconnecting with an old friend. Humble and good-natured, Ector is a musician clearly in love with his art and an artist eager to share stories and experiences. The drummer invited me to listen to his third solo recording, Organatomy, (American Showplace Records) which turns out to feature a burning organ/guitar/tenor/drum combo. In conversation with Ector about his music, I asked him why he decided to make a record with such a distinctive lead instrument.

“I decided to do an organ date because of my history with [organist] Charles Earland. Charlie gave me my first record date on Ready & Able (Muse, 1995),” Ector tells me. “We had a long history because we both grew up in South Philly. His niece worked for my childhood doctor and knew I was a kid who played drums from a young age. Every year she would show me her Uncle Charlie's new LP. Little did I know he would give me my first major break. I toured Europe for the first time with him as well.”

Organatomy sets itself apart by including a Brazilian-flavored original, a spry Jobim cover and adds trumpeter Claudio Roditi and percussionist Café on several tracks. As a leader, Ector artfully balances his arranging skills with soulfully played compositions like Ellington’s “In A Sentimental Mood,” a version that swings with a hip bass and drum vamp. It’s part of a diverse playlist of spirited originals and fresh takes on Gillespie and Joe Henderson tunes. Organist Kyle Koehler has grooves for days, with a persuasive B-3 message and melodic flourishes that inject “Aries,” a Don Patterson and Sonny Stitt original collaboration, with beauty and brawn.

From an historical perspective, Ector reveals, “This CD is more of a homage to all of the great [jazz] organists I was fortunate enough to see as a kid including Don Patterson himself. Philly has a long B-3 history and I felt it was time to record an organ CD because I have always had a fondness and respect for the tradition. This time I decided to write a few pieces that I thought represented the many uncommon facets of the instrument such as a samba (“Karen's Dance”) that’s typically not heard on organ.” 

Organatomy ushers Vince Ector into the ranks of Philly’s Kings of Swing - a group that includes Larry McKenna and pianist Jimmy Amadie. His modern-leaning take on the classic jazz organ group has flow and plenty of percussive excitement, along with what Ector says is “swing, groove, excitement. Rhythmically, it takes chances – what makes a great organ CD.”  (9 tracks; 48 minutes)

Labels: , , , , , ,

JAZZ IN SPACE: VINCE ECTOR, ORGANATOMY

Thursday, December 5, 2013

VINCE ECTOR, ORGANATOMY


Meeting drummer Vince Ector for the first time, after attending singer Giacomo Gates’ unabashedly hip and swinging 2013 appearance at Dizzy’s Club Coca Cola in NYC in support of his Miles Davis tribute CD, was like reconnecting with an old friend. Humble and good-natured, Ector is a musician clearly in love with his art and an artist eager to share stories and experiences. The drummer invited me to listen to his third solo recording, Organatomy, (American Showplace Records) which turns out to feature a burning organ/guitar/tenor/drum combo. In conversation with Ector about his music, I asked him why he decided to make a record with such a distinctive lead instrument.

“I decided to do an organ date because of my history with [organist] Charles Earland. Charlie gave me my first record date on Ready & Able (Muse, 1995),” Ector tells me. “We had a long history because we both grew up in South Philly. His niece worked for my childhood doctor and knew I was a kid who played drums from a young age. Every year she would show me her Uncle Charlie's new LP. Little did I know he would give me my first major break. I toured Europe for the first time with him as well.”

Organatomy sets itself apart by including a Brazilian-flavored original, a spry Jobim cover and adds trumpeter Claudio Roditi and percussionist Café on several tracks. As a leader, Ector artfully balances his arranging skills with soulfully played compositions like Ellington’s “In A Sentimental Mood,” a version that swings with a hip bass and drum vamp. It’s part of a diverse playlist of spirited originals and fresh takes on Gillespie and Joe Henderson tunes. Organist Kyle Koehler has grooves for days, with a persuasive B-3 message and melodic flourishes that inject “Aries,” a Don Patterson and Sonny Stitt original collaboration, with beauty and brawn.

From an historical perspective, Ector reveals, “This CD is more of a homage to all of the great [jazz] organists I was fortunate enough to see as a kid including Don Patterson himself. Philly has a long B-3 history and I felt it was time to record an organ CD because I have always had a fondness and respect for the tradition. This time I decided to write a few pieces that I thought represented the many uncommon facets of the instrument such as a samba (“Karen's Dance”) that’s typically not heard on organ.” 

Organatomy ushers Vince Ector into the ranks of Philly’s Kings of Swing - a group that includes Larry McKenna and pianist Jimmy Amadie. His modern-leaning take on the classic jazz organ group has flow and plenty of percussive excitement, along with what Ector says is “swing, groove, excitement. Rhythmically, it takes chances – what makes a great organ CD.”  (9 tracks; 48 minutes)

Labels: , , , , , ,

0 Comments:

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home